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Attn: Parents of Autistic Children

8 answers
2 years ago
My daughter, Paisley is will be 3 in a few weeks. I have noticed a lot of Autistic symptoms in her over the last 18 months. I've mentioned it to her doctor a few times, and he has assured me that at her 3 year check up, if I still have a concern, he will do a formal evaluation. In the meantime, I'm looking for some advice from a parent of an Autistic child to see if these behaviors signal Autism. Beware, this may be a long post, and I apologize in advance for that. -She shows no empathy for others. None. She has been known to laugh at children when they fall and get hurt, she has hit and head-butted her baby sister, all the while seeming to not have a care in the world that she hurts their feelings, or hurts them physically. -Difficulty expressing her emotions. She has never once expressed an emotion to me. Never an, "I'm sad, angry, hurt, etc., Mommy." She has difficulty understanding facial cues, and other peoples emotions. She recognizes her baby sister's cries, and will say things like, "baby sister, cry." I explain that her sister is upset, and trying to tell me something b/c she can't talk yet. After my explanation, she looks at me like I'm speaking a foreign language. -Poor speech development, and a regress in speech. She spoke in sentences at 13 months, but around 18 months or so, it slowed down tremendously. She now has a vocab of about 100 words, give or take. However, she barely communicates using sentences. ex: When she wants something, she's very vague. I'm lucky to get one or two words out of her such as "Pink", or "Bubee" (blueberries). When I say, "Pink what, Paisley?", she has a tremendous meltdown that lasts for at least 15 minutes. Sometimes up to an hour. -Extreme tantrums that go WAY BEYOND typical toddler b.s. On any given day, I deal with at least 5 tantrums. Sometimes up to 10 or 15. All lasting no less than 15 minutes. Yesterday, she had a tantrum because she couldn't find her blue mega block. I pointed to it, and showed her where it was, but that wasn't good enough. It was the wrong one. The tantrum lasted nearly 2 hours, complete with screaming, crying, kicking, throwing herself on the floor, etc. She has even been known to pull at her hair. She doesn't pull it out, just tugs at it. -OCD tendencies. She requires no less than 4 toothbrushes when it's time to brush her teeth. She demands to brush them no less than 5 times a day. I only allow it 2 times a day. After breakfast, and before bed. She takes 35 stuffed animals to bed, 9 blankets, 4 pillows, and 8 rubber ducks/elephants/turtles. If there is one item missing, she instinctively knows, and a horrific tantrum ensues, yet again. When I put her to bed at night, I have to point out every item so she knows it's all there. -Fascination with odd things on toys. She has a giant plastic piano, and xylophone. I have seen her use them for their intended purposes maybe 3 or 4 times. She's perfectly content with plugging up the screw holes on the back with her fingers so she can hear the 'pop' noise it makes when she pulls her fingers out. -No interest with other children her age. When I take her to story time she refuses to sit still, and instead wanders off into the children's section to rearrange and stack the books. When the other kids join the room, she goes around snatching books from their hands so she can rearrange and stack those to. At play dates, she has no interest with the other kids. She has always been way to happy playing on her own, off in a corner somewhere. -She obsessively collects Fruit Buddy caps, and washcloths, having a meltdown when a certain color is missing. -She covers her ears with her hands at strange times. Just to do it. There doesn't have to be any loud noises, or over-stimulation to cause this. Once again, I apologize for this being so long. I'm just looking for some answers until we get a formal diagnosis. After much research, I have realized that she meets the necessary criteria.

answers (8)

2 years ago
I don't have any experience with Autism, so I can't give you any advice regarding what you've described. However, if I were to experience this with one of my kids and my pediatrician didn't take the concerns seriously, I'd find a new one for a second opinion. Autism is a big deal, and the earlier that treatment is started, the better. Also, my pediatrician has me do an Autism checklist at the two year check-up. It's just like the regular developmental checklists, but it's specifically about Autism related things. A lot of what you mentioned is on that checklist. If I were in your shoes, I'd be very concerned, and I'd definitely be finding a doctor who listens to my concerns.
2 years ago
i have never completed an autism checklist. only a developmental checklist. what does concern me is that yesterday when i went through an m chat autism questionaire online she scored a nine, and it informed me that she is at an elevated risk for autism. i printed out the results so i can show her ped at our upcoming appt. if he doesnt take me seriously this time, i will find a new doctor and get a second opinion. also i went through a tell tale autism checklist for three yr olds and she exhibits seven out of the ten symptoms. to me, that screams autism.
2 years ago
My daughter has asperger syndrome,In her case it is very mild.She can't handle loud noises,if it's loud she will cover her ears and scream and cry.She wasn't able to express herself verbaly untill she started therapy,She would hit people and bite people without realizing that they were in pain. She is just now able to tell me how she feels, and make eye contact. She had alot of the symptoms yo said paisley has, Aspergers is a form of autism,and I agree that it does "scream" autism. Definatly talk to her pediatrician about it, and if he/she doesn't do something get a new ped.
2 years ago
She often bashes her head into the wall, and into my pit bull's heads, and it doesn't seem to faze her. She can be tackled by the dogs, and it's the same.She'll just get right up, and act like like nothing ever happened.  However, if she trips and falls, she acts like someone is cutting off a limb.She repeats herself a lot. Yesterday, she asked me for a pickle, repeating 'pickle' 30 times+. She dragged me by my pants leg over to the fridge, while repeating the word over and over, even after I gave it to her. She got into my face, and my husband's face screaming, "pickle! pickle! pickle! piiiiiiiicccckkkle!" with her fistfull. We just had to continuously say, "Yes, Paisley. Pickle. We see your pickle.", because she went on and on for 15 minutes. -I had to cut the straps out of the high chair because she became so obsessed with them. She would hang her stuffed animals by their necks using the straps, swinging them back and forth for a good hour or two. Every time I would pull her away from it, she a horrid tantrum would ensue, and she went right back to it.-This morning when she asked for fruit buddy snacks, she didn't eat them. She lined them up on the kitchen table, while counting each one, repeatedly.-In regards to loud noises, she seems to like them sometimes. I often have to go into her room and turn down to volume on her TV, because she will crank it up as loud as possible. Yet, when I turn on a vaccum, or hair dryer, she flips out. She screams, covers her ears, and often hides behind a cabinet door in the kitchen.
2 years ago
@ashyandtiffThe hardest thing about this has been getting my husband on the same page with me. Since I first mentioned it, his response has always been the same. "Your over-analyzing this. She's fine. She's just a little different. There's nothing wrong with her. I think you just want a label for her so that you have an excuse for her behavior......." When I express to him that I have legitamate concerns, and it's something that I can't just ignore, he becomes enraged, telling me to stop worrying about her so much. I'm the mother, I know her better than anyone. I've stayed at home with her since the day she was born, therefore, I witness a lot more of her odd behaviors than he does. I explain to him that if she is autistic, it doesn't mean that she's stupid, or disabled. I point out that many people believe Einstein, Thomas Jefferson, Emily Dickinson, Mozart, and Van Gogh were autisic. Proof that just because your brain operates differently, doesn't mean that you won't be a successful person. Any suggestions on how to get him to realize that this is very real, and the sooner that we can get her help the better? I'm talking to her ped about it at the next visit, and she's going to get some help, whether or not he agrees with it. I'm certainly not going to deny my daughter the necessary treatment just because he thinks she's fine. This topic seems to be a source of frustration and argument for us every time I talk about it. Do you have any advice for me on how to handle this?
2 years ago
Hello,I wrote a really long post and it deleted when I submitted so this one will be short. Funny I found your post researching effects of pickles on autistic children after my son had an episode after eating one last night.I have a 3 year old boy with high-functioning autism and his behaviors used to parallel your daughter's described behaviors. It sounds like through your research you have come to the conclusion that she probably is autistic.I wanted to write and tell you we changed to an all-natural/orgainic gluten, casein (dairy), and soy free diet and the changes he has made are miraculous! Some autistics lack an enzyme to properly break down the aforementioned items and break them down into opiates similar to morphine. There are many other things to avoid (vaccines? fillings? dyes, artificial sweeteners, sugar, metals, HFCS (may contain mercury) etc.) but you will figure out what works for her/you.We still have some issues and bad days but overall the changes are astonishing (e.g. playing and interacting with sister, other kids and adults, no more headbanging, bizarre head rubbing on the floor, speaking, etc. I could go on and on). He still has some different interests than a normal 3 year old (trains, cars, rockets, space, math/numbers, reading, spanish, classical music....) but plays and interacts with kids mostly normally now.You should really research diet change as her behavior sounds so much like his.Oh, btw my response when my wife told me about the diagnosis was "they can go f themselves if they think he is autistic" but after some in depth research it was obvious. I'm sure your husband will come around if he does some good research. Also, even some "trusted sources" may have some bad information so be thorough.Also, get a second opinion, your Dr. may not be familiar with the symptoms. A Dr. friend of ours said no but his pediatrician and my cousin who used to work with autistic children picked it up right away. This comes back to what is autism?
2 years ago
Hello,I wrote a really long post and it deleted when I submitted so this one will be short. Funny I found your post researching effects of pickles on autistic children after my son had an episode after eating one last night.I have a 3 year old boy with high-functioning autism and his behaviors used to parallel your daughter's described behaviors. It sounds like through your research you have come to the conclusion that she probably is autistic.I wanted to write and tell you we changed to an all-natural/orgainic gluten, casein (dairy), and soy free diet and the changes he has made are miraculous! Some autistics lack an enzyme to properly break down the aforementioned items and break them down into opiates similar to morphine. There are many other things to avoid (vaccines? fillings? dyes, artificial sweeteners, sugar, metals, HFCS (may contain mercury) etc.) but you will figure out what works for her/you.We still have some issues and bad days but overall the changes are astonishing (e.g. playing and interacting with sister, other kids and adults, no more headbanging, bizarre head rubbing on the floor, speaking, etc. I could go on and on). He still has some different interests than a normal 3 year old (trains, cars, rockets, space, math/numbers, reading, spanish, classical music....) but plays and interacts with kids mostly normally now.You should really research diet change as her behavior sounds so much like his.Oh, btw my response when my wife told me about the diagnosis was "they can go f themselves if they think he is autistic" but after some in depth research it was obvious. I'm sure your husband will come around if he does some good research. Also, even some "trusted sources" may have some bad information so be thorough.Also, get a second opinion, your Dr. may not be familiar with the symptoms. A Dr. friend of ours said no but his pediatrician and my cousin who used to work with autistic children picked it up right away. This comes back to what is autism?
2 years ago
Hello,I wrote a really long post and it deleted when I submitted so this one will be short. Funny I found your post researching effects of pickles on autistic children after my son had an episode after eating one last night.I have a 3 year old boy with high-functioning autism and his behaviors used to parallel your daughter's described behaviors. It sounds like through your research you have come to the conclusion that she probably is autistic.I wanted to write and tell you we changed to an all-natural/orgainic gluten, casein (dairy), and soy free diet and the changes he has made are miraculous! Some autistics lack an enzyme to properly break down the aforementioned items and break them down into opiates similar to morphine. There are many other things to avoid (vaccines? fillings? dyes, artificial sweeteners, sugar, metals, HFCS (may contain mercury) etc.) but you will figure out what works for her/you.We still have some issues and bad days but overall the changes are astonishing (e.g. playing and interacting with sister, other kids and adults, no more headbanging, bizarre head rubbing on the floor, speaking, etc. I could go on and on). He still has some different interests than a normal 3 year old (trains, cars, rockets, space, math/numbers, reading, spanish, classical music....) but plays and interacts with kids mostly normally now.You should really research diet change as her behavior sounds so much like his.Oh, btw my response when my wife told me about the diagnosis was "they can go f themselves if they think he is autistic" but after some in depth research it was obvious. I'm sure your husband will come around if he does some good research. Also, even some "trusted sources" may have some bad information so be thorough.Also, get a second opinion, your Dr. may not be familiar with the symptoms. A Dr. friend of ours said no but his pediatrician and my cousin who used to work with autistic children picked it up right away. This comes back to what is autism?

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