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Beer-Can Chicken and Baked Potatoes Recipe

David Loftus

You might think I'm crazy for putting a recipe with beer in Parenting, but the alcohol cooks away and the steam from the beer makes the meat tender and juicy, so it's actually a great family meal. When shopping, look for a free-range chicken that was raised without hormones or antibiotics. It might cost a bit more, but it's tastier and better for you.

Serves 6

Total Time: 1 hour 50 minutes

4 peeled garlic cloves

Leaves from a small bunch of fresh thyme

4 Tbsp olive oil

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, a pinch at a time, to taste

3 1/2-lb chicken

12-oz can of Dad's favorite beer (pour half into a glass for him!)

1 3/4 lb small baking potatoes

2 Tbsp honey (remember: honey should not be served to babies under the age of 1)

2 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce

2 Tbsp organic ketchup (contains no artificial flavors)

Bake: Preheat oven to 400°F. Mash the garlic with the thyme using a mortar and pestle, then mix in 3 Tbsp olive oil and salt and pepper. Rub all over the chicken, inside and out (don't forget to wash your hands after!). Stand a half-full can of beer in a roasting tray, then set the chicken upright, with the cavity over the can. Scrub and prick the potatoes all over, place in a tray, and coat with 1 Tbsp oil and a pinch of salt. Bake the chicken on the middle rack, with the potatoes on the rack underneath, for 1 hour 25 minutes.

Glaze: Mix the honey, Worcestershire, and ketchup. After 1 hour 10 minutes, brush the chicken with some glaze. Reduce the heat to 300°F and cook for the final 15 minutes, glazing every 5 minutes until sticky and delicious.

Carve: Move the chicken to a carving board and insert a sharp knife into thigh—if juices run clear, it's ready. Remove the skin and slice the meat (learn an easy way to do this at jamieshomecookingskills.com/roasting).

Serve: Skim off the chicken fat from the roasting tray, then spoon the juices over the chicken before tucking in. Serve with the baked potatoes and a green salad.


How Big's a Serving?

Adults = 3 oz skinless cooked chicken, 3 1/2 oz cooked potato, and 1 cup salad.

Ages 2 to 11 = 1 to 2 oz cooked chicken, 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 oz cooked potato, and 1/2 to 1 cup salad (depending on child's age, size, and activity level).

The Skinny of the Skin

The skin is where all the fat is, so just serve a tiny bit as a treat.

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