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Breakfast Treats for Weekend & Holiday Mornings

  • Matt Greenland

    Mile-High Popovers

    My kids love these popovers. It's their No. 1 request for a weekend breakfast. I love them, too, piping hot from the oven with a spoonful of Rhubarb-Raspberry Sauce or Blueberry-Plum Sauce. They take 40 minutes to bake, so plan accordingly. You can play around with the ingredients, using different types of flour or adding millet, finely chopped nuts or seeds for texture and protein. To freeze, cool almost completely, then place the popovers in a zip-close plastic bag and freeze. Reheat the popovers on a piece of foil in a preheated 350°F oven for about 10 minutes. Do not microwave.

    143 calories for 1 popover

    Protein: 6 g; Carbohydrates: 18 g; Fat: 5 g; Fiber: 0 g; Sodium: 101 g; Carb Choices: 1; Diabetic Exchange: 1 Starch, ½ Low-Fat Milk

    Makes 6 popovers

    1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour

    1 cup 2 percent milk

    2 large eggs, plus 1 large egg white

    1 tablespoon canola oil

    Pinch of salt

    Canola oil cooking spray

    1. Place a rack in the center of the oven and preheat oven to 450°F. Have a six-cup nonstick popover pan ready.
    2. In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and beat with an electric mixer on high speed for 30 seconds. Scrape down the sides of the bowl and beat 15 seconds more.
    3. Preheat the popover pan for 2 minutes, then remove it from the oven and grease the cups with cooking spray. Divide the batter evenly among the cups.
    4. Bake for 20 minutes, then reduce the heat to 350°F and bake for 20 minutes longer or until popovers are puffed and golden. Remove popovers from the oven and serve immediately.

    Recipe from "The Calories In, Calories Out Cookbook: 200 Everyday Recipes That Take the Guesswork Out of Counting Calories—Plus, the Exercise It Takes to Burn Them Off," © 2014 Catherine Jones and Elaine Trujillo. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, The Experiment.

  • Matt Greenland

    Whole Wheat Pancakes

    Light, airy and delicious. I took my mother's original recipe and reduced the calories by cutting way back on the butter. My mother had written a note on the recipe that said, "Don't skip the butter, and be sure to brown it to get that nutty flavor." So, I used a small portion of butter, but it's too little to be worth the trouble of browning. The pancake batter can be made up to 2 days in advance. Any leftover pancakes should be covered and refrigerated; reheat them in an ungreased nonstick skillet just until hot, 1 to 2 minutes per pancake. Don't use the microwave, which will make the pancakes unpleasantly rubbery. You can play around with different flours or flour blends. I sometimes mix all-purpose flour with an ancient grain flour blend by King Arthur Flour, which produces delicious pancakes. One of my recipe testers used buckwheat flour, which turned out really well, too.

    216 calories for 3 pancakes

    Protein: 8 g; Carbohydrates: 27 g; Fat: 9 g; Fiber: 2 g; Sodium: 237 mg; Carb Choices: 2; Diabetic Exchange: 2 Starch 1 Fat

    Makes about 12 pancakes, serves 4

    1 large egg

    1¼ cups 2 percent milk

    ½ teaspoon vanilla extract

    ½ cup unbleached all-purpose flour

    ½ cup whole wheat flour

    2 teaspoons baking powder

    Pinch of salt

    2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

    Canola oil or cooking spray

    1. In a large bowl, whisk the egg, milk and vanilla. Add the flours, baking powder and salt, and whisk until smooth. Add the melted butter and whisk until well incorporated.
    2. Heat a medium nonstick skillet over medium to medium-high heat until hot. Using a heatproof brush, lightly grease the skillet with canola oil or cooking spray. Add a scant 1/3 cup of batter and immediately swirl the batter to form a pancake. Cook until the surface bubbles and sets and the underside is golden brown, usually a little longer than 1 minute. Flip the pancake with a wide spatula and cook for 1 minute more or until cooked through. Transfer to a plate or platter.
    3. Repeat this procedure with the remaining batter, lightly greasing the skillet as needed. You can keep the pancakes warm in a low oven.

    Recipe from "The Calories In, Calories Out Cookbook: 200 Everyday Recipes That Take the Guesswork Out of Counting Calories—Plus, the Exercise It Takes to Burn Them Off," © 2014 Catherine Jones and Elaine Trujillo. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, The Experiment.

  • Law Soo Phye

    Oat Flour Buttermilk Waffles

    I love a good waffle, preferably hot off the waffle iron, drizzled with warm pure maple syrup and sprinkled with fresh blueberries. These crisp, light waffles are ideal for leisurely weekend breakfasts, and they can also be made in advance, frozen, and reheated in a toaster for quick and easy weekday breakfasts. If you love nuts and can afford a calorie splurge, add 1/3 cup finely chopped pecans (which will add 50 calories per serving) to the batter. To freeze, place the cooled waffles in a plastic container, ideally separated by baking paper, and freeze.

    303 calories for 4 waffles

    Protein: 12 g; Carbohydrates: 40 g; Fat: 11 g; Fiber: 2 g; Sodium: 477 mg; Carb Choices: 2.; Diabetic Exchange: 2 Starch, 1 Skim Milk, 1 Fat

    Calorie Cuts

    Skip sugary syrups or jams, and top your waffles with a low-calorie jam, fresh fruit or a sprinkle of confectioner's sugar.

    Makes about 20 regular-size waffles; serves 5

    1 cup oat flour

    1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour

    1 tablespoon baking powder

    1 tablespoon sugar

    ¼ teaspoon salt

    2 large eggs, separated, plus 1 large egg white

    3 tablespoons canola oil

    2 cups reduced-fat buttermilk

    Canola oil cooking spray

    1. Place the dry ingredients in a large bowl and whisk together.
    2. In a small bowl or large measuring cup, whisk together the egg yolks, canola oil and buttermilk. Add this mixture to the dry ingredients and whisk until well blended; set aside.
    3. Place the 3 egg whites in a large bowl and beat with an electric mixer on medium speed for about 30 seconds or until frothy bubbles begin to appear. Increase the speed to high and beat until stiff, glossy peaks form, or about 2 to 3 minutes. Gently fold the whites into the reserved batter.
    4. Preheat your waffle iron on high heat. Spray the hot waffle grids with cooking spray or brush with oil. Spoon some batter onto the hot grids and spread it almost to the edges. Close the lid and cook until the waffles are golden brown. Serve immediately. Repeat with the remaining batter.

    Cooking note: To prevent cooked waffles from getting soggy, place them on a cake rack or lean them against each other in a tent-like formation to allow the steam to escape. If they do get soggy or cold, reheat them in a toaster or a preheated 350°F oven; place them directly on an oven rack for a few minutes.

    Recipe from "The Calories In, Calories Out Cookbook: 200 Everyday Recipes That Take the Guesswork Out of Counting Calories—Plus, the Exercise It Takes to Burn Them Off," © 2014 Catherine Jones and Elaine Trujillo. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, The Experiment.

  • Law Soo Phye

    Walnut Spice Coffee Cake with Maple Glaze

    Easy, quick and loaded with nutty flavor, this coffee cake is a joy any time of day, including dessert. I've included a recipe for a decadent maple glaze, which takes the cake to a new level. Store leftovers in an airtight container for up to 3 days; if keeping longer, cover and refrigerate or freeze.

    247 calories for 1 serving without maple glaze

    Protein: 5 g; Carbohydrates: 21 g; Fat: 17 g; Fiber: 1 g; Sodium: 155 mg; Carb Choices: 1; Diabetic Exchange: 1½ Starch, 3 Fat

    307 calories for 1 serving with maple glaze

    Protein: 5 g; Carbohydrates: 31 g; Fat: 19 g; Fiber: 1 g; Sodium: 158 mg; Carb Choices: 2; Diabetic Exchange: 1 Starch, 3 Fat

    Calorie Cuts

    Omit the maple glaze, which adds 60 calories per serving. Reduce the walnuts to 1 cup and save 21 calories and about 2 grams of fat per serving.

    Serves 12

    Canola oil cooking spray

    1 1/3 cups chopped toasted walnuts

    1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour, plus extra for the cake pan

    1 teaspoon baking powder

    ½ teaspoon baking soda

    1 teaspoon ground ginger

    2½ teaspoons ground cinnamon

    ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg

    ¼ teaspoon salt

    3/4 cup packed brown sugar

    2 large eggs

    1/3 cup canola oil

    1 teaspoon vanilla extract

    ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons reduced-fat sour cream

    1 tablespoon confectioner's sugar, for dusting, if you are not using the maple glaze

    Optional Maple Glaze

    2 tablespoons unsalted butter

    ¼ cup packed brown sugar

    3 tablespoons 2 percent milk

    1 cup confectioners' sugar

    1. Place a rack in the center of the oven and preheat oven to 350°F. Grease a 9-inch round cake pan with cooking spray and dust with flour; set aside.
    2. Place the walnuts in the bowl of a food processor and pulse until finely ground; do not process to a paste. Transfer the ground walnuts to a medium bowl and add the flour, baking powder, baking soda, ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt. Mix until well combined; set aside.
    3. In a large bowl, using an electric mixer, beat the brown sugar and eggs on medium speed for about 4 minutes or until light and fluffy. Add the canola oil, vanilla extract and sour cream and beat 30 seconds more. Using a rubber spatula, fold the egg mixture into the reserved flour mixture until well incorporated. Pour the batter into the prepared cake pan. Bake for 30 minutes or until a cake tester inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean.
    4. Remove the cake from the oven and let cool for 5 minutes, then run a knife around the sides of the pan and invert the cake onto a serving platter.
    5. To make the maple glaze, combine the butter, brown sugar and milk in a small saucepan and heat over medium heat, stirring constantly, until it reaches a full boil. Remove from the heat and cool to room temperature. Whisk in the confectioners' sugar until smooth.
    6. Spread the glaze on the cooled cake and allow to set for 1 hour before serving. If not using glaze, dust with 1 tablespoon of confectioner's sugar.

    Recipe from "The Calories In, Calories Out Cookbook: 200 Everyday Recipes That Take the Guesswork Out of Counting Calories—Plus, the Exercise It Takes to Burn Them Off," © 2014 Catherine Jones and Elaine Trujillo. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, The Experiment.

  • Law Soo Phye

    Lemony Blueberry Corn Muffins

    After they'd consumed many batches of these muffins, my family and friends unanimously decided that they are best made without muffin liners. Baking them directly in a greased muffin pan creates a crispy exterior, a wonderful foil to the fluffy, soft interior laced with juicy blueberries. Because blueberries have a tendency to sink, I roll them in a bit of flour before adding them to the batter, which helps keep them suspended. The muffins can be kept in an airtight container at room temperature for up to three days; they can be refrigerated for five days or frozen for up to 1 month. Muffins are best thawed at room temperature or in a conventional oven, not a microwave. To incorporate the holidays, try making these "Kids' DIY Turkey Muffins" with the finished product.

    120 calories for 1 muffin

    Protein: 2 g; Carbohydrates: 16 g; Fat: 5 g; Fiber: 1 g; Sodium: 136 mg; Carb Choices: 1; Diabetic Exchange: 1 Starch, 1 Fat

    Makes 12 muffins

    Canola oil cooking spray

    1 cup fresh blueberries

    ½ cup plus 1 tablespoon unbleached all-purpose flour

    ½ cup yellow cornmeal

    1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

    1/3 cup sugar, plus a little extra for sprinkling

    ½ tablespoon baking powder

    ¼ teaspoon baking soda

    ¼ teaspoon salt

    1/3 cup nonfat plain yogurt

    ¼ cup 2 percent milk

    1 tablespoon grated lemon zest

    2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

    ¼ cup (60 ml) canola oil

    1 large egg

    1. Place a rack in the center of the oven and preheat oven to 375°F. Spray a 12-cup muffin pan with cooking spray; set aside. Roll the blueberries in 1 tablespoon of the flour and set aside.
    2. In a large bowl, combine the remaining ½ cup flour, the cornmeal, cinnamon, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt and whisk until well combined. Set aside.
    3. In a small bowl, combine the yogurt, milk, lemon zest, lemon juice, canola oil and egg and whisk until blended. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ones, stirring until the flour is well incorporated. Fold in the reserved blueberries.
    4. Divide the batter evenly among the muffin cups, filling each cup about three-quarters full. Sprinkle the top of each muffin with a little sugar. Bake for 20 minutes or until a cake tester inserted in the center of a muffin comes out clean. Transfer the muffins to a rack and cool slightly before serving.

    How to Make Picture-Perfect Muffins Every Time

    When making fruit muffins, reserve some of the fruit before starting the recipe. For the Lemony Blueberry-Corn Muffins, reserve 1 to 2 blueberries per muffin. Do not roll these blueberries in flour. After you scoop the batter into the muffin cups, arrange the reserved fruit on top of the batter and then tuck it in, leaving it about halfway exposed for a lovely presentation. You can also do this with nuts, banana chunks, berries or dried fruits.

    Recipe from "The Calories In, Calories Out Cookbook: 200 Everyday Recipes That Take the Guesswork Out of Counting Calories—Plus, the Exercise It Takes to Burn Them Off," © 2014 Catherine Jones and Elaine Trujillo. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, The Experiment.

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