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11 Cool Science Fair Projects from Pinterest

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    Charge it!
    We’ll always make time for this potato-powered clock from OC Mom Activities. It’s a science fair classic.

    Check out one student's successful science fair story.

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    Egg-cellent experiment
    If your kid is required to use the scientific method in his science project, then these egg geodes from Tinker Labs are a great choice. Plus, could they look any cooler?

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    Over the rainbow
    Warning: These rainbow flowers from Paint Cut Paste may not be the best choice for klutzy kids (spilled food coloring? yikes!), but young gardeners will love the colorful end result.

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    Squish!
    What childhood is complete without Gak, the squishable, squeezeable putty toy and modeling compound? This how-to from Come Together Kids  is perfect for younger scientists. Just don’t call it Goop.

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    DIY flubber
    Not to be confused with Gak, Goop is a great project for learning about solids and liquids. Mom to 2 Posh Lil Divas has an easy recipe!

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    Trick or treat
    If your kid’s a candy lover, this is the science project for him. Middle School Survival Guide’s Yummy Gummy Bears Lab will have them seeing their favorite gummy in a whole new dimension!

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    Bling bling
    Snowed in? Make your own icicles with Sweet and Simple Things’ DIY crystal snowflake how-to.

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    Rinse and repeat
    “Exploding” Ivory soap is an undeniable Pinterest sensation. But have you tried it yet? Wendolonia provides an easy how-to. (Don’t worry, Mom, it doesn’t actually explodemore like mushrooms into a wild un-soaplike shape.)

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    Brusha brusha brusha
    Budding scientists love anything with bubbling goo. Making Memories With Your Kids offers up their recipe for “elephant toothpaste”great for a beginning chemistry project.

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    Start your engines
    Physics isn’t just for high schoolers. Help your little one to learn about force and motion with this race car experiment from Librarianism Chronicles.

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