You are here

Get Answers

Sometimes it's nice to get advice from experts with a lot of letter degrees behind their names, but other times, you just need to hear what another parent (with a M.O.M. behind her name) has done that has worked. You've got questions? These moms have answers.
 

flat head

12 answers
Hi, I'm expecting a baby girl in ten weeks and am scared of her getting a flat head because it seems like all of my friends' kids got one! With all the recalls going on now I need help figuring out which product or sleeping technique would be the best for my baby when she gets here! :) Thanks, Rachel.

answers (12)

I was told to minimize the flat head thing, usually babies tend to sleep on one side or the other, so observe and see if this is the case. if so, to my understanding, it helps some kids if you put something of interest on the opposite side of her norm to try and coax her into sleeping on the other side of her head...obviously nothing big or dangerous in the crib...could simply be a mobile that you switch sides of the crib or something of that nature.
Thanks for your answer!My mother in law says I can always use a helmet but I'm really not looking forward to seeing my baby girl wear one of those for a year or more...+ they're ridiculously expensive. My mother on the other hand wants to get me the Lifenest sleeping system. What do you think about it? I looked it up and it seems really reliable but I'm still indecisive.
The helmets are more for the babies who are born with flat heads, and the two I've known who wore them didn't have them on for more than six months.  Actually, most of the rest of us were envious - additional padding for when they fell over while learning to walk! The only way to really combat a flat head while sleeping is to be hyper-aware of which side your baby's head is lying on.  Frankly, my son was able to turn his head by 2 months, and would do it on his own without assistance, so no matter what I did, he always ended up facing the right.  As far as I can tell, this didn't affect his head shape at all.  And he slept really well (still does), so I couldn't care less which way he faces.
Envious of this thing? I think it's important to fall to learn how to walk like a normal human being rather than being hyper-protected 24/7...Anyway thanks for your advice. I read that around 20% of babies in the US suffer from a flat head so I want to be extra cautious. The thing that comforted me about the Lifenest was being able to let my baby have her tummy-time without worrying...Do you know anyone who uses it?
I would be very careful adding extra things to a crib. They recomend that infants have nothing in their crib, other than a tight fitted sheet to reduce the risk of SIDS. If flat head is a serious concern talk to your childs DR. before you purchase it, and see what he or she recomends.
Make sure baby has plenty of tummy time.  They sleep on their back, are in the car seat, bouncer, swing on their backs.  Make sure the baby has lots of tummy time. My daughter spent lots of time on her tummy during the day when we played.  She set up by herself at 3 months, crawled at 5 and walked at 10 because she was so strong and I contribute it to all her tummy time. 
Thanks for all the advice! I talked to a few doctors who told me they hadn't seen the product much before because it's so new (apparently came out early this year) but that it's completely safe to put in a crib and that i shouldn't worry about it as long as i follow the starting-to-crawl limit! :)Tummy time is extremely important, you're right. I tried making my boys have as much as they could when they were babies themselves and was impressed to see how quickly they evolved in the movements. Thanks again for the replies!
Sounds like you are being very proactive and addressing your concerns about plagiocepahly before the birth of your baby, which is great! While plagiocephaly occurrences have risen drastically in recent years, there is plenty you as a parent can do to prevent it once your child is born. It is important to change the position of your baby’s head throughout the day, to prevent them from favoring a certain area of the head. When feeding your baby, try alternating the arm you hold them in, and encourage them to turn their head to a different side each time they are fed. Alternate the side of the changing table you stand on when changing your baby’s diaper to encourage them to turn their head in alternate directions in order to look at you. Make sure to implement plenty of supervised “tummy time” during the day, and try massaging your baby’s neck when they’re relaxed and calm to encourage stretching on both sides of the neck. Another technique is to place interesting and stimulating toys in new locations around baby’s room so they will have to turn their head different directions in order to see the toys. Spreading awareness to friends and family is key to ending plagiocephaly. Keep being proactive, and feel free to visit https://www.facebook.com/DrJaneScottfor more information and to join the mission to end plagiocephaly!  
Sounds like you are being very proactive and addressing your concerns about plagiocepahly before the birth of your baby, which is great! While plagiocephaly occurrences have risen drastically in recent years, there is plenty you as a parent can do to prevent it once your child is born. It is important to change the position of your baby’s head throughout the day, to prevent them from favoring a certain area of the head. When feeding your baby, try alternating the arm you hold them in, and encourage them to turn their head to a different side each time they are fed. Alternate the side of the changing table you stand on when changing your baby’s diaper to encourage them to turn their head in alternate directions in order to look at you. Make sure to implement plenty of supervised “tummy time” during the day, and try massaging your baby’s neck when they’re relaxed and calm to encourage stretching on both sides of the neck. Another technique is to place interesting and stimulating toys in new locations around baby’s room so they will have to turn their head different directions in order to see the toys. Spreading awareness to friends and family is key to ending plagiocephaly. Keep being proactive, and feel free to visit https://www.facebook.com/DrJaneScottfor more information and to join the mission to end plagiocephaly!  
Sounds like you are being very proactive and addressing your concerns about plagiocepahly before the birth of your baby, which is great! While plagiocephaly occurrences have risen drastically in recent years, there is plenty you as a parent can do to prevent it once your child is born. It is important to change the position of your baby’s head throughout the day, to prevent them from favoring a certain area of the head. When feeding your baby, try alternating the arm you hold them in, and encourage them to turn their head to a different side each time they are fed. Alternate the side of the changing table you stand on when changing your baby’s diaper to encourage them to turn their head in alternate directions in order to look at you. Make sure to implement plenty of supervised “tummy time” during the day, and try massaging your baby’s neck when they’re relaxed and calm to encourage stretching on both sides of the neck. Another technique is to place interesting and stimulating toys in new locations around baby’s room so they will have to turn their head different directions in order to see the toys. Spreading awareness to friends and family is key to ending plagiocephaly. Keep being proactive, and feel free to visit https://www.facebook.com/DrJaneScottfor more information and to join the mission to end plagiocephaly!  

Pages

*DISCLAIMER
Parenting.com's Answers are provided by members of our community. While your fellow moms and our editors have plenty of great advice to offer based on their experience, it is not a substitute for professional medical help. Always consult a medical professional when seeking medical advice. All submitted answers are subject to the rules set forth in our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use