You are here

Get Answers

Sometimes it's nice to get advice from experts with a lot of letter degrees behind their names, but other times, you just need to hear what another parent (with a M.O.M. behind her name) has done that has worked. You've got questions? These moms have answers.
 

Why won't my daughter say "more milk"?

4 answers
My daughter is 21 months old and when she wants more milk or anything out of reach she says "eh eh". She can say more but she just won't and when I try to get her to use words she throws a fit. What can i do?

answers (4)

My daughter would not say it either.  Strange because she was very verbal.  So we taughter her how to say it in sign language.  She is now 3 and asks with words and her sign language.  Be patient with her.  Its a stange and she will be talking up a storm very soon.
I was going to say that it might help to try signing. It can't hurt at least. It's easy for babies and toddlers to pick up on and it's one more way for them to communicate.
I agree with the previous two posts. Try teaching her the sign for "more" and "milk". My two year old still loves it that she knows so many signs and she is now "teaching" her little sister the signs. A good signing dictionary is here: http://www.mybabycantalk.com/content/dictionary/dictionaryofsigns.aspx?letter=A 
Sign language won't help your daughter to actually say the words and can actually delay her language skills more. Your daughter is old enough to talk and if she can say words and uses other words well I wouldn't worry. My daughter was a good and early talker saying 15-20 words just after her first birthday. But once she learned that non-verbal communication was easier for her and more effective on us she stopped trying to talk almost completely. It wasn't until she was about 2 years old that she finally started talking again. She'll be three this October and she's still having trouble with pronunciation, although she's doing much better overall with her talking. Having had one of "those" kids, I'd say just wait it out. Do what you can to get her to use as many other words as possible and make sure you're always saying the words she should be using. She'll get over it eventually, phases like this aren't abnormal. But I would suggest that you don't further her reliance on non-verbal communication. Sign language can be a great tool for younger babies and toddlers who honestly can't say the words, but once they start talking it's important to focus on developing those verbal language skills rather than the non-verbal ones. I know of too many kids who relied solely on sign language and even though their parents said the words with the signs they were delayed verbally because they never had to put out the effort to speak.

*DISCLAIMER
Parenting.com's Answers are provided by members of our community. While your fellow moms and our editors have plenty of great advice to offer based on their experience, it is not a substitute for professional medical help. Always consult a medical professional when seeking medical advice. All submitted answers are subject to the rules set forth in our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use