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Create a School Garden with Whole Foods

Veer

Have you ever noticed how much more willing kids are to eat vegetables that they grow themselves?  If you’ve never grown a garden with your children, you should give it a try.  It’s amazing to watch them consume healthy fruits and vegetables that they would have refused to eat if you had sprung them on them at the dinner table.

Maybe you don’t garden at home.  But does your school have a garden?  Now could be your chance to get one off the ground with the help of the Whole Kids Garden Grant Project.

If you’re like many in America, Whole Foods Market has been helping your family eat healthier for years.  I’m a huge fan of Whole Foods because they make it so easy to find good food without having to dig through a ton of junk.  Now they’re formalizing their efforts to improve wellness and nutrition through their new Whole Kids Foundation, a charitable organization that will partner with schools, educators and other organizations to provide kids with access to healthful food.

Their first major initiative, launching later this month, will be the Whole Kids Garden Grant Project, which will provide grants to schools and nonprofits to help them implement or expand on-campus teaching gardens.  I can't think of a better way to get kids excited about healthy eating.

"By collaborating with schools and parents, we believe we can increase fruit and vegetable consumption both at schools and at home and make a significant contribution in the fight against childhood obesity," said Walter Robb, Whole Foods Market co-CEO and Whole Kids Foundation board chairman.

The Whole Kids Foundation is based in Austin, Texas, and operates as an independent, nonprofit organization with its own board of directors. For more information on the Foundation and how to apply for a school or community garden grant through the Whole Kids Garden Grant program, visit: wholekidsfoundation.org or e-mail info@wholekidsfoundation.org.

Kathryn Thompson is a mom to two school-aged kids, a toddler and a deceased betta fish. She can also be found at The Parenting Post, DaringYoungMom.com and occasionally the gym.

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