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Gleanings in Bee Culture, 1898, Vol. 26: A Journal Devoted to Bees, and Honey, and Home Interests (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from Gleanings in Bee Culture, 1898, Vol. 26: A Journal Devoted to Bees, and Honey, and Home InterestsWhile speaking of foul brood I may. Say something of my experience with it. In Jan uary, 1894, I purchased an apiary that was dis eased. The former owner had transferred some combs, and used them in the extracting super. These combs had the very first begin ning of foul brood in them. In this way he introduced the disease to a nice apiary, and at the end of t begin ning of foul brood in them. In this way he introduced the disease to a nice apiary, and at the end of two years - the time I purchased the stock - I think it was four colonies that were pretty badly diseased, two of them very bad. The first year I had them, four more colonies developed it. The second year, two the third year, one while the fourth year (1897) none showed disease.During this experience I have watched it very closely and, so far as it goes, I am led to believe that the disease. Does not progress very rapidly at first. I should expect, where slight contagion has been introduced, say in the fall or early spring, that the colony infect ed might live over that summer, possibly to die the next spring and be robbed out, and so communicate the disease to a number of other colonies in the yard. At this rate, about three years from the introduction of the disease would practically finish an apiary if it were not looked after. Possibly it may develop more rapidly at times but this is my observa tion in one of my own apiaries, covering a term of four seasons, every colony thoroughly inspected from four to six times each season.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. read more