It Might Be: A Story of the Future Progress of the Sciences, the Wonderful Advancement in the Methods, of Government and the Happy, State of the People (Classic Reprint)

AMAZON

It Might Be: A Story of the Future Progress of the Sciences, the Wonderful Advancement in the Methods, of Government and the Happy, State of the People (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from It Might Be: A Story of the Future Progress of the Sciences, the Wonderful Advancement in the Methods, of Government and the Happy, State of the PeopleThe two men suddenly stopped. They were at the side of a great bowlder, which seemed lately to have rolled down from the heights above, and to have lodged at the roots of a great tree, which had been blown down by some storm in the now long ago, tearing up an embankment of earth five or six feet high, andeen blown down by some storm in the now long ago, tearing up an embankment of earth five or six feet high, and into the basin thus left in the mountain's side this massive bowlder had fallen. As they paused and looked around them, they noticed that there were great tracks down the side of the mountain, which had been made by the awful plunge of some over hanging rock as it rushed down to the valley below, tearing the trees and bushes from their ancient resting place in its downward plunge and scattering the brush here and there, tearing great holes in the ground as it leaped from cliff to cliff. After looking sharply about for a few moments and listening intently, the doctor replied: It is the moan of some man or beast in great pain. But, Elverton, what means this great confusion, and What power has loosed those mighty rocks and sent them plunging to the valley yonder? I did not notice this strange appearance until now, I was so excited in my search for. That deer you wounded down there.Tis strange, very strange, Doctor. You see that the trees are not injured, 'except where some rock has crashed into them. Had this been caused by some great storm, the other trees and bushes would show its effects as well; and up there where those rocks came from no cyclone or such storm ever reaches. It is above the limit of such storms.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. read more